A tree representation of genetic relationships between H3N2 influenza viruses from 2002 to 2007. The thicker line on the tree represents the successful evolutionary trunk lineage that gives rise to all influenza strains over time. The tree is colored according to estimated geographic location, indicating high permanence of the trunk in China and Southeast Asia. Figure courtesy of Lemey P, Rambaut A, Bedford T, Faria N, Bielejec F, et al.

What can data science tell us about influenza?

by Gabriela Cybis For most people, catching the flu is a common minor inconvenience: they get a bad headache, maybe a fever, sore throat, cough, sometimes they will miss a day or two of work and be miserable at home for a while. But after a few days it is back to business as usual.  Most…

The Importance of Age-Specific Medication for Newborns

by JJ Bhongsatiern When the father of a baby girl told me of the recent death of his daughter, he spoke of his great pain and confusion. His recently born (newborn) daughter had been prescribed a codeine-containing cough medicine of the same type that previously had been helpful to the father when he had a cough.…