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Computers Inspired by the Human Brain

By Gina Adam You may be able to read this text effortlessly but don’t be fooled into thinking that reading is an easy task! It took you many years of learning and long hours in school to become proficient at recognizing letters and words. How does your brain do it? The brain consists of 10 billion cells called…

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Hungry? Technology might tell you what to eat.

by Anicia Peters Brian was on vacation with his family driving through Minnesota. As they approached Woodbury, Minnesota, they decided to stop by the nearest fast food restaurant, a Wendy’s, to pick up a light “snack.” Brian was a technologist so when he walked up to the counter he immediately noticed that the menus consisted…

Figure 2: Ozonation reactor (left) including a soil sample, and the excess ozone gas is trapped in the beaker to the right to be measured.

Ozone as a Safer and Greener Alternative to Pesticides

by Nahed Msayleb The use of pesticides to control plant diseases that live in the soil affects beneficial microorganisms that are necessary for nutrients to circulate and hence limits soil fertility. Accordingly, the need for more eco-friendly ways to control plant diseases is growing. A potential alternative to the synthetic pesticides that deplete soil biodiversity and…

Screenshot of the Erdas Imagine interface: on the left is a false color image showing water bodies (blue/dark) and healthy vegetation as red. On the right is a processed image for daily ET, where pixels with higher ET having a lighter color, for example the water bodies and the irrigated fields.

A view from Space: using satellites to manage water

by Mcebisi Mkhwanazi For decades, satellite imagery has been used for environmental monitoring, with water management being one of the areas of application. For example, many are familiar with the Landsat images showing Lake Chad in Africa shrinking over the years. Now satellites are used for more than just providing visual images. This paper discusses…